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Pinball:
ROM Chips & Software Updates

Pinball & Video ROM Chips & Software Updates
We have ROM chips and software upgrades in stock for most makes and models of pinball machines and several classic arcade video games. Everything from standard replacement chips, to the latest available upgrades, to special custom and "home" version ROM chips for some games.

Chips and upgrades are easy to install and come with installation instructions. You can also view installation instructions online (with pictures!)

Page Contents:

Game ROM Chips & Software Updates:

Click here to browse for ROM chips, or use the Search feature at the top of any page to search by game name to see what ROM chips and updates we have for your game.

For example, enter "Addams Family ROMs" to search for ROM chips for Addams Family.

Not finding what you need? Contact us.

ROM Chip / Software Update Pricing & Exchange Program:

We no longer do an exchange program for ROM chips. ROM chips are now sold outright with no deposit, and no need to return your old ROM chips for exchange.

Software updates sent out on USB keys or SD memory cards will have a deposit which is refundable if you return the USB key or SD memory card within 30 days of purchase. Return is optional- you may keep the USB key or SD memory card ifi you wish (many customers like to keep these for backups). But deposit will not be refunded if media is not returned within 30 days of purchase.

USB keys and SD memory cards returned for deposit refund must be:
  • Returned to us within 30 days of purchase only (no deposit refund is given after 30 days).
  • The same USB key or SD memory card we sent to you for the update (no substitutes will be accepted).
  • In good, clean, physical condition.
  • In good working condition (no "dead" or otherwise non-functional media can be accepted).
  • Returned by the original purchaser- we do not accept media from, or issue exchange credit to, anyone other than the original purchaser of the media.
Deposits are refunded by the same payment method you used to pay with.

ROM Chip Testing Services:

If you have a ROM chip that you suspect is faulty or problematic, we can test it for you.

There is a $20 minimum charge for ROM chip testing. This charge covers testing of up to 4 chips. Testing of additional chips is $5 per chip.

If you wish to have your chip(s) tested, please contact us first, so we can verify what kind of chip(s) you have, and provide you with shipping address and other necessary information.

Chips are shipped to us, and return-shipped to customer, at customer's expense.

It's not necessary to include payment when you send in your chips- we can send you an e-mail invoice for payment after testing is complete, or you can provide us with a credit/debit card number to charge to.

PLEASE NOTE: Package your chips properly before shipping to avoid damage and added replacement cost! Chips are very delicate and can be damaged if not properly packaged for shipping. See the next section for recommendations.


ROM Chip Packaging for Shipment:

If you're sending chips into us for testing, chips must be packaged carefully and properly to avoid damage during shipping. We are not responsible for chips that arrive damaged.

Chips should be pressed into some styrofoam so that legs are safe and they don't move or bounce around during shipping. Or use a clear plastic "chip tube" which also protects against damage. Some examples:
GOODGOOD

Chips that are badly packaged, simply wrapped together in padding, or just dropped in an envelope are likely to be destroyed during shipping. Some examples of bad packaging:
BADBAD
We are not responsible for chips that arrive damaged!
  • We do not and will not try to repair damaged chips or straighten out bent legs (they usually break when we do, due to metal fatigue/stress).
  • If your chip(s) arrive damaged due to poor packaging, you will have to buy new replacement chip(s).
  • Be sure they are packaged and secured properly before shipping.


Returns & Refunds:

  • All ROM Chip sales are final. These are electronic parts that are not eligible for return, refund, or exchange.

  • Software Updates on USB Keys and SD Memory Cards ("media") may be returned for deposit refund within 30 days of purchase, as described above. Any media received after 30 days from date of purchase will be refused- no exceptions.
  • If you have a ROM chip or media that you suspect is defective, please see the Warranty & Replacement section below, before contacting us.
  • If you ordered the wrong ROM chip, or an extra ROM chip that you ended up not using, we will not take them back. Electronic parts are not eligible for return, refund, or exchange. We supply only what you order, or ask us for, so we cannot be responsible if you order the wrong chip, or order something that you end up not using. Please verify your order before placing it, so you are sure of what you need.
  • There are no refunds on:
    • Shipping & handling costs for ROM chips and media. Customer pays for any and all shipping & handling costs, to and from our shop.
    • Programming & handling service charges. This is minimum charge per media unit (covers labor and equipment costs) that is invested to produce the item you order, and cannot be reversed (or 'un-done'), so is not refundable.
    • ROM Chip and/or Software Licensing Fees (if applicable). Some ROM chips we sell are licensed by the manufacturer and include a small fee paid to the manufacturer to cover the license cost and processing, which is not refundable.
    • ROM Chips that were originally sent in to us for update only.
    • Any ROM chips or media that are damaged in any way- internally or externally, physically or electronically.
  • See the warranty & replacement section below for information on returning or replacing ROM chips or media that may be defective.

Warranty & Replacement:

  • All ROM chips and USB keys / SD Memory Cards ("media") that we provide are warranted against defects in workmanship and operation for 30 days from date of purchase only.
  • Warranty does not cover:
  • ROM Chips or media found to be defective due to a fault of our own will be replaced free of charge, or a full refund will be given (less shipping & handling costs), if returned within 30 days from date of purchase, and unit is in fact verified to be defective due to a fault of our own (see below for more info).

  • If you have received a ROM chip or media from us that you suspect is defective, you can:

    1. Return the unit and we will test it to determine operability:
      • Units that are not defective can be returned to you, and an additional shipping charge will apply for the return shipping.
      • Units that are defective, and that are found to be defective due to a fault of our own, will be replaced at no charge, and with no extra shipping cost to ship replacement chip(s) to you. We will not replace or ship replacement units for free that have been damaged and returned to us as defective (all ROM chips and media are tested before we ship to you).
      • Return shipping is via First Class or Priority Mail- customer pays any extra costs if overnight or Express shipping is requested.

        (All charges must be paid before unit is returned or before replacement is shipped out.)

      - or -

    2. Replacement unit(s) can be sent out to you, but a new full charge for the replacement unit(s) and shipping/handling will apply, and must be received before any units can be sent out. (Return shipping is via First Class or Priority Mail- customer pays any extra costs if overnight or Express shipping is requested.)

      A refund of total cost (including shipping cost up to amount for Priority Mail only) will be honored if original chip is returned within 30 days and is in fact determined to be defective due to a fault of our own. No refund will be given if returned units are not defective (see Returns & Refunds above.)

    NOTE: We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause, but about 99% of suspected "defective" ROM chips and media returned to us turn out to be fine, and problems end up being related to mishandling, misinstallation, improper removal/replacement of connectors or circuit boards, other existing issues in the game itself, or rare "bugs" that are occasionally discovered in some software, which we have no control over. We obviously cannot afford to provide and ship replacement chips at no charge when problems so frequently lie elsewhere in the game or with mishandling. We thank you in advance for your understanding.

    If you are uncomfortable with the replacement of ROM chips or media in your game, please consider enlisting the help of an experienced professional. You can find resources for help via our Game Service & Repair page.

What is a ROM Chip Anyway?:

A ROM chip is a computer chip that holds the "software" or "computer instructions" inside your game. The software is what makes the game work, or play, the way it does. Just like your personal computer at home, pinball machines and video games also run on software. Instead of storing this software on a disk (like your computer does), games store their software on ROM chips.

Here is a picture of a ROM chip, as used in the Williams White Water pinball machine:



ROM chips can be easily removed and reinstalled (just like a floppy disk in your computer). Special programming equipment is used to read and write the software on the ROM chip.

You can easily update the software in your game to a newer version, if available.
Click here to browse, or use the Search feature at the top of any page to search by game name. Chips are easy to remove and replace- instructions are available on our Technical Articles page.

See our section on How to Determine Software Version in Your Pinball Machine if you have any questions on how to check the software revision currently in your game, or on changing/updating your game's ROM chip(s).


What is a USB memory key or SD Memory Card?:

Several brands of modern pinball machines use a USB or SD interface to upgrade their game software- ROM chips are no longer used on these systems.

A USB memory key or SD memory card is used to install the updated software into the game's system. USB memory keys (or "flash drives") are used on personal computers and are basically the modern day equivalent to the floppy disk or a CD-ROM. SD memory cards are often used in devices like digital cameras and cell phones.

Not all USB memory keys are compatible with the Stern S.A.M. system games. USB memory keys that we sell and ship are correct types, and are compatible with the new Stern games.

All USB key updates and SD memory card updates that we send out include step-by-step instructions for installation.


How to Determine Software Version in Your Pinball Machine:
Locations of ROM Chips in Various Games:

If you want to update the software in your pinball machine, you'll first want to see what version of software you currently have in order to determine if a newer update is available, or if you have the latest version already installed.

Compare what you have currently installed in your game to what we have listed on our site to see if there is a newer version available. If so, you can order that newer version.

To find ROM chips and software updates on our site, simply search for the name of your game, and then look for "ROM Chips" or "Software Update" in the search results. Then click that item to see the item description, and to select and order.

Some games may have multiple updates available (listed in order of newest to oldest). Or multiple individual or groups of ROM chips available.

If you have an older game with ROM chips, be sure to check for updates for each of the ROM chips in your game (can be up to 9 or 10 ROM chips in some games- see below for listing and location of ROM chips in most popular types of games).

The way to determine the software/ROM version you currently have varies from manufacturer to manufacturer, and also depends on the age of the game:
  • Most games will display software revision information in the display when you first turn them on, and while they are booting up. Others will display the information when you first put them into audits, or "test" mode.
  • ROM chips on the boards in the backbox are often labeled with the software revision information (image below):


    Game ROM installed on MPU board in Williams 'White Water'



Here are a few examples of how to find software versions in some common types of games: (click any link to jump to that section below)

NOTE: The information below assumes you have factory-original circuit boards in your game. If your game has aftermarket replacement board(s) installed, this information may not apply.

  • Atari Pinballs (1977-1984):

    These games usually did not have any software updates produced for them, so ROM chips typically do not need to be replaced unless you have one that goes bad.

    Atari used two board sytems over the years- Gen 1 and Gen 2. All games used Gen 1 except for Hercules and Superman which used Gen 2.

    The Gen 1 board is the large board located in the center of the bottom of the main cabinet on early games. Consult your game manual/schematics for further info if you need help locating this board or these chips.

    The Gen 2 board is located in the lower left corner of the backbox on later games. Game ROM chips are located near the right side of the board, and are in locations J-7, K/L-7, and M-7 (see image below).

    To determine ROM software version, check your game manual, or look for any version information on any labels that may be on the ROM chips.






  • Bally and Stern Pinballs (1977-1984):

    These games usually did not have any software updates produced for them, so ROM chips typically do not need to be replaced unless you have one that goes bad, or is missing.

    ROM chips in games that did not have updates from the factory are generally considered "original version" or "Version 1" (Rev 1, L-1, Set 1, V1, etc).

    If you have a game that did in fact have more than one version produced for it, it's often difficult or impossible to tell what software version is currently installed in the game. Best way to try to determine is by checking for any labels on the ROM chips that might give any version information.

    Some original chips may also have a factory part number printed on them (sometimes under the chip label) that you can cross-reference to try to determine what version it might be.
    • In Bally games, factory ROM chip part numbers started with "E-" (such as E723-14 for Eight Ball chip U1, version 1). If you can find this info, you can look up the number in our online Bally ROM chart.
    • In Stern games, factory ROM chip part numbers started with "25A-ROM-" (such as 25A-ROM-P21 for Meteor chip U1). If you can find this info, you can look up the number in our online Stern ROM chart.
    Game ROM chips are located on the MPU board in the backbox (see image below). This is the board in the upper left corner of the backbox that has the red or green LED near the bottom center that blinks when the game is turned on and is booting up. Look for ROM chips in locations U1 through U6 on these boards (not all chip sockets U1 through U6 will be populated). Consult your game manual/schematics for further info if you need help locating this board or these chips.

    Most sound boards in these games from 1978/79-up will use ROM chips as well. Sound board type and location will vary depending on the age of the game.

    Bally games typically had their sound boards mounted in the lower right corner of the backbox, or on the back swing-out panel of some special edition games (Eight Ball Deluxe Limited Edition, Mr. & Mrs. Pac-Man, Rapid Fire, Centaur II).

    Stern games typically had their sound boards located on the left inside wall of the backbox (early games did not use sound ROM chips, later games did).

    Consult your game manual/schematics for further info if you need help locating these boards and/or the ROM chips on them.

     




  • Bally Pinballs (1985-1989): 6803 System

    Most of these games will display software revision information when you enter the "test", or "diagnostic" mode, via the buttons on the inside of the coin door. Consult your game manual/schematics for further info if you need help entering test/diagnostic mode.

    Game ROM chips are located on the MPU board in the backbox (see image below). This is the board in the upper right corner of the backbox. Game ROM chips are in locations U2 and U3 on this board (one location may be empty).

    Sound boards in these games will use ROM chips as well. Type and location of sound board may vary, depending on the model. See image below, or consult your game manual/schematics for additional info.

     




  • Capcom Pinballs:

    Try going into the "test", or "diagnostic" mode via the buttons on the inside of the coin door to find ROM version info. Consult your game manual/schematics for further info.

    Game ROM chips are located on the CPU board in the backbox (see image below). CPU board is mounted on the back side of the speaker/display panel. Consult your game manual if you need help accessing the CPU board. Game ROM chips are in locations U1H, U2H, U1L, and U2L on this board.

    Sound board will use ROM chips as well, and is located inside the backbox along the left side. Sound ROM chips are in locations U28, U29, U30, and U31 on this board.






  • Data East Pinballs 1987-1995:

    ROM information is shown on the score display during startup, and/or after entering audits/diagnostics mode via buttons on inside of coin door. Consult your game manual for further info if you need help entering audits/diagnostic mode.

    Location of ROMs and circuit boards in Data East games will vary depending on the age of the game (see images below).

    MPU board will use locations B5 and C5 for game ROM chips (one location may be empty).

    Early games (Laser War, Secret Service, Torpedo Alley) will have the MPU board located in the lower left corner of the backbox. Sound board is located in the upper left corner of backbox, and will use locations 5J (or F6/7), 6J (or F4), and 7J (or F5) for sound ROM chips.

    Mid games will have the MPU board located in the upper right corner of the backbox. Sound board is located in lower right corner of backbox, and uses locations F4/5, F5/6, and F7 for sound ROM chips.

    Late games will have the MPU board located in the upper right corner of the backbox. Sound board is located in lower right corner of backbox, and uses locations U7, U17, U21, U36, and U37 for sound ROM chips.

    Data East MPU Board Game ROM Locations:

    (Click to enlarge)


    Games with dot-matrix score displays will have one or two display ROM(s) located on the back side of the score display unit.

    Data East Display ROM Chips:

    (Click to enlarge)


    DISPLAY ROM TECH NOTE: If you are replacing TWO rom chips with ONE rom chip (or vice-versa), then you will need to make one jumper change on the display driver board in order for it to work correctly with the new chip(s). Click here for details.

      




  • Game Plan Pinballs:

    These games usually did not have any software updates produced for them, so ROM chips typically do not need to be replaced unless you have one that goes bad.

    It's often difficult or impossible to tell what software version is currently installed in the game. Best way to try to determine is by checking for any labels on the ROM chips that might give any version information.

    Game ROM chips are located on the MPU board, and sound ROM chip is located on the sound board (in games that use a sound board).

    Boards are located in the backbox on upright model games (see image below), and in the main cabinet under the playfield on cocktail table model games. Consult your game manual/schematics for further info if you need help locating or accesing boards in your game.

    MPU board will use up to 3 game ROM chips (not all may be used on all models). These are locations A (U12), B (U13), and C (U26) on the MPU board.

    Sound board will use 1 sound ROM chip (see image below).






  • Gottlieb Pinballs 1978-1980: System 1

    These games often did not have any software updates produced for them, so ROM chips typically do not need to be replaced unless you have one that goes bad.

    System 1 games have the MPU board in the top center area of the backbox. Sound board is typically mounted in the main cabinet (on games that use a sound board).

    MPU board will use one PROM chip located near the top left corner of the board, mounted vertically. This PROM chip will have a letter code stamped on it in white ink which denotes the specific model of game it is used in (ie: "A" = Cleopatra, "B" = Sinbad, etc.) Click here for a list of System 1 PROM codes and the games they are used in.)

    Sound board will use a sound PROM chip that is common to most games (not game-specific).

    We do not have replacements for Gottlieb System 1 PROM chips (old/obsolete technology, no longer available parts). This information is provided here for reference only.




  • Gottlieb Pinballs 1980-1983: System 80

    To determine ROM software version, check for any labels on the ROM chips that might provide any version information.

    These games often did not have any software updates produced for them, so ROM chips typically do not need to be replaced unless you have one that goes bad.

    For games that did have more than 1 version of ROM software available, the version number is usually denoted after a backslash at the end of the numbers on the label on top of the ROM/PROM chip. For example, Black Hole may have a game ROM label that reads "668/1" for version 1. Or "668/4" for version 4.

    System 80 games have the MPU board in the top center area of the backbox. On early games, sound board may be mounted in the main cabinet. On later games, it is typically mounted in the lower left corner of the backbox.

    MPU board will use two game ROM/PROM chips located near the top/right of the board at locations PROM1 and PROM2 (some boards may use only 1 chip here). These boards will also use two system ROM/PROM chips at locations U2 and U3.

    Sound board will use a PROM chip (early games) and a ROM chip (later games).

    Consult your game manual/schematics for further info if you need help locating boards and/or chips.

    We do not have replacements for Gottlieb System 80 ROM/PROM chips. If you are technically inclined and interested in replacing/upgrading ROM/PROM chips on your System 80 board, click here for some technical info regarding modifications that can be done to replace older-style chips on these boards.




  • Gottlieb Pinballs 1983-1989: System 80A, 80B

    To determine ROM software version, check for any labels on the ROM chips that might provide any version information.

    These games often did not have any software updates produced for them, so ROM chips typically do not need to be replaced unless you have one that goes bad.

    For games that did have more than 1 version of ROM software available, the version number is usually denoted after a backslash at the end of the numbers on the label on top of the ROM chip. For example, Genesis may have a game ROM label that reads "705/1" for version 1. Or "705/4" for version 4.

    Consult your game manual/schematics for board and ROM chip locations.

    We do not have replacements for Gottlieb System 80A/80B ROM chips. Information here is provided for reference only.




  • Gottlieb Pinballs 1989-1996: System 3

    To determine ROM software version, check for any labels on the ROM chips that might provide any version information.

    These games often did not have any software updates produced for them, so ROM chips typically do not need to be replaced unless you have one that goes bad.

    Consult your game manual/schematics for board and ROM chip locations.

    We do not have replacements for Gottlieb System 3 ROM chips. Information here is provided for reference only.




  • Jersey Jack Pinballs:
    1. Turn game on and allow it to fully boot up and go into "attract mode" (game waiting to be played/started).
    2. Open the coin door and locate the 4 service buttons on the inside of the door, near the bottom.
    3. Press the "Enter" button momentarily. You should see the game's LCD monitor change and display the main menu screen.
    4. The current date and time will be shown in the lower right corner of the screen along with the version of software that the game is currently running.
    5. To exit the menu and return to attract mode, press the "Back/Escape" button inside the coin door, and close the door.





  • Sega & Stern Pinballs ~1995-2004: Whitestar board system

    ROM information is usually displayed on score display during startup, or after entering audits/diagnostics ("Portals") mode via buttons on inside of coin door. Some late-model games may not show any software version information at startup- see the next section below for more info on these later games.

    Game and sound/speech ROM chips are located on the CPU/Sound board which is in the upper right area of the backbox (see image below). Game ROM is at location U210 near the upper right corner of the board. Sound ROM U7 is near the left center of board on early games, and near the bottom edge of the board in later games. Speech ROMs are near the bottom edge of the board in locations U17, U21, U36, and U37. Not all speech ROMs may be used in all games (some locations may be empty).

    Score display driver board will use 1 or 2 ROM chips (usually 1), and is located on the back side of the score display unit. Display ROM chip(s) go in locations ROM0 and ROM1. ROM1 may be empty on most games (not used).

    Consult your game manual if you need help accessing boards in your game.






  • Stern Pinballs (2004-up):

    ROM/software revision information may or may not NOT be automatically displayed on the score display during startup- depending on the exact game/model. If your game does not show the software version info at startup, turn the game off, and hold the RIGHT flipper button in while you turn power back on, and continue to hold, and the game will show software revision information as it boots up.




  • Williams Pinballs 1977-1985: Level 3, 4, 6, 6A, 7

    Game ROM information is displayed in the 1st player display when you enter audits mode, via the buttons on the inside of coin door. The first number is the game production number, and the second is the software revision number (usually 1, 2, 3, or 4, for L-1, L-2, L-3, or L-4, respectively):



    MPU board is located in the upper left corner of backbox. Sound board is located in main cabinet (early games) or in upper right corner of backbox (later games).

    Unique Level 7 games Joust and Varkon will have their boards mounted in the lower main cabinet.

    Shuffle alley games will have their boards mounted in the back of the machine (rear panel access).

    Locations of ROM chips on boards will vary depending on the age of your game (see images below).

    Consult your game manual if you need help accessing boards in your game.

    Most games had updates to the game ROM chip IC14. In Level 7 games, IC14 and IC26 were both updated together to go to a newer version (replace both chips at same time). Sound and speech ROM chips never had any updates in these games, and should not have to be replaced unless you have one that has failed.

    If you need to replace an old PROM chip on a MPU board Level 3, 4, 6, or 6A (any chip at locations IC21, IC22, IC26), you will have to scrap these chips, and install a new "combo" IC14 to replace IC21, IC22, IC26 (IC21, IC22, IC26 must be empty chip sockets when IC14 is used). This may require installing a new chip socket at location IC14 if your board did not come with one from the factory.

    On an older model sound board, when replacing an old PROM chip with a modern ROM/EPROM chip, you will have to change some wire jumpers on the board in order for the new ROM/EPROM to function properly (see last image below, or game schematics).

        




  • Williams Pinballs 1985-1989: System 9, 11, 11A, 11B, 11C

    Game ROM information is displayed in one of the score displays when you enter audits mode, via the buttons on the inside of coin door. Consult your game manual if you need help accessing audits mode, or locating boards/chips in your game.

    Which score display, and how, the game ROM version information is displayed, will depend on the age of your game.


    Black Knight 2000 showing game ROM revision "LA-4" installed


    Sound ROM information is not displayed, so you will have to look for any labels on the sound ROM chips to see what software version information they may show.

    See images below for locations of boards and ROMs on boards.

    System 9 games will use game ROMs on the MPU board at locations U19 and U20 (U19 may not be used), and a sound ROM chip at location U49. Speech ROM chips (if used) are on a small satellite board to the left of the MPU board.

    System 11, 11A, 11B, and 11C games will use game ROMS on the MPU board at locations U26 and U27. BOTH must be replaced at the same time with the same software version in order to work properly. Sound/speech ROMs are located at locations U21 and U22 on the MPU board as well.

    Most System 11, 11A, 11B, and 11C games will have a separate background sound board connected by a small ribbon cable and located just above the MPU board. These boards can vary depending on the age of the game, but most will use up to 3 ROM chips on this board, locations U4, U19, and U20 (not all may be used depending on the game).

    Tech tip: Click here for a listing of different System 11 board variations and what games they were used in, as well as forward/backward compatibility between these boards.

    Williams System 11 MPU Board ROM Locations:

    (Click to enlarge)

    Early System 11 Sound Boards:

    (Click to enlarge)

    Mid & Late System 11 Sound:

    (Click to enlarge)


    (Click to enlarge)


     




  • Bally/Williams (WPC) Pinballs (1990-1999):

    Game ROM revision information is usually displayed while game is starting up:


    Game ROM revision is also available by entering menu system via ENTER button on inside of coin door:


    After displaying the above, the game will pause for about 1 to 2 seconds, then display the sound ROM revision info:



    See images below for board and chip locations.

    MPU board is located in the lower left corner of backbox. Sound board is located at top/center of backbox.

    MPU board will use one game ROM at location U6 (early games) or location G11 (later games).

    Sound board (early games 1990-1994) will use up to three ROMs in locations U14, U15, and U18.

    Sound board (DCS board 1994-1995) will use up to eight ROMs in locations U2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 (not all locations may be used, depending on the game).

    Sound board (late games 1995-1999) will use up to six ROMs in locations U2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 (not all locations may be used, depending on the game).

      



    Changing ROM chips back to English language:

    Some games originally intended for overseas (outside the U.S.) destinations had special ROM chips installed at the factory for foreign (non-English) language.

    To change such a game back to English language, you may need to replace some ROM chips, or make some software/hardware adjustments, depending on the type of game. Usually just the game and/or display ROMs need to be changed. Sound ROMs were usually always in English and do not need to be changed, in most cases.

    Most non-English chips will have an identifying letter as part of the
    software revision information on the chip label. For example, a German language chip might be labelled "G4.01", or "LG2", whereas an English (American) chip would be labeled "A4.01", or "LA2", etc. Click here for information on determining software revision information in your game, or contact us if you have any questions.

    NOTE: You can always look up a full listing of available chips, by game name. Click here to browse, or use the Search feature at the top of any page to search by game name. Each game's listing will show all available chips we carry for that game, along with revision information, where available. Online ordering is also available there.

    Here is an alphabetical list of game types by manufacturer, and the chips that usually need to be changed:
    (If you don't see your game/type listed here, contact us for information.)

    All games up to 1985:
    Most games prior to 1985/1986 did not have language-specific ROM chips installed, so no need to change these. There were a few exceptions- such as some games that used foreign-language speech ROMs (Flash Gordon and Xenon, for example). If you have any questions on a specific game, feel free to contact us.

    Bally Pinballs 1985-1989 (6803 MPU):
    19 Bally pinballs were made that used the 6803 MPU board which featured 1 or 2 language-specific ROM chips- U2 and U3. (Eight Ball Champ through Atlantis). Chips to change:
    • Game ROM U2 and/or U3.
    Sound ROMs do not need to be changed.

    - Here is an example from the selection of ROM chips we carry: Escape From the Lost World

    Bally Pinballs 1989-1990 (System 11 MPU):
    Williams took over Bally pinball in 1989 and still manufactured games under the Bally name, but often used Williams circuit boards and hardware. See "Williams Pinballs 1985-1990" below for more info.

    Bally Pinballs 1990-1999 (WPC MPU):
    See "Williams Pinballs 1990-1999 (WPC MPU)" below.

    Data East Pinballs 1987-1994:
    Most Data East games require changing both game ROM and display ROM chips. Some games may use just one chip for game or display- others may use two. It depends on the game.
    • Game ROM B5 and/or C5.
    • Display ROM 0 and/or ROM 1 (later Data East- some games may have chips labelled "ROM0" and "ROM3")
    Sound ROMs do not need to be changed.

    - Here is an example from the selection of ROM chips we carry: Maverick

    Sega Pinballs 1994-1998:
    Sega took over Data East pinball, so most early Sega games were the same configuration as late Data East.
    • Early Sega:
      • Game ROM B5 and/or C5
      • Display ROM 0 and/or ROM 1 (some games may have chips labelled "ROM0" and "ROM3")
    • Later Sega:
      • Game ROM U210
      • Display ROM 0
    Sound ROMs do not need to be changed.

    - Here is an example from the selection of ROM chips we carry: Frankenstein

    Stern Pinballs 1999-up :
    Stern Pinball took over Sega pinball and earlier Stern Pinball games had the same configuration as late Sega games did. Later-model Stern Pinball games now use a USB memory key to upgrade the game software instead of ROM chips.

    Early Stern Games:
    • Game ROM U210
    • Display ROM 0
    Sound ROMs do not need to be changed.

    - Here is an example from the selection of ROM chips we carry: High Roller Casino

    Late-Model Stern Games:
    • USB memory key update
    (ROM chips no longer used.)

    - Here is an example from the selection of ROM chips we carry: Pirates of the Caribbean

    Williams Pinballs 1985-1990 (System 11 MPU): (Including some Bally games that used the Williams System 11 board)

    The Williams System 11, 11A, 11B, and 11C MPU boards use two language-specific ROM chips- U26 and U27.

    Some of the first early System 11 and System 11A games (click here for list) will only require a jumper to be changed on the MPU board in order to switch between two languages, such as German and English, and may not require ROM chip changes at all. On these games, jumper W7 is removed (clipped) for German language. Jumper W7 is installed for English language. Jumper W7 is located near chip U49- between the flipper relay and battery holder on the MPU board. See the Locations of ROM Chips section below for details, and a picture indicating exact location of the ROM chips and W7 jumper.

    Later games (System 11B and System 11C - click here for list), do not use a jumper for language change, and instead, require 1 or more ROM chips to be changed, depending on the game. Some games may require only chip U27 to be changed. Others may require both U26 and U27 to be changed.

    See the ROM chip listing for your specific game for exact details. Click here to browse ROM chips or use the Search feature at the top of any page to search by game name.

    Sound ROM chips in System 11 games do not need to be changed when switching from one language to another.

    You can find and order replacement ROM chips by using the Search feature at the top of any page, and searching by game name.

    Williams (and Bally) Pinballs 1990-1999 (WPC MPU):
    Bally and Williams games of this era were both manufactured by Williams Electronics, and used the WPC MPU board.

    Most WPC games do not require ROM chip changes to change the language. Language is selectable through the game's menu system- software adjustments/settings. And also by way of jumpers or DIP switches on the MPU board (for "default language"- see below).

    A select few (less than 5 or 6) of these games actually have versions of some chips (game AND sound ROMs) that are foreign-language-specific (non-English). Some that use these are WhoDunnit and World Cup Soccer. There may be others. If you have one of these games, look them up for further details. You can click either game name above, or search by game name using the Search feature at the top of any page.

    Most Bally/Williams WPC games will have the desired language selected in the game's software settings/adjustments. Refer to your game manual for the exact information on this.

    These games also have a "default language" setting that causes specific language/options to be loaded/set when the game is initialized (by factory reset, ROM chip version change, or loss of memory (removal or drainage of batteries)). The default language is specified by jumper settings (early games) or DIP switch settings (later games) on the MPU board itself.

    There is a chart of jumper/DIP settings inside the front cover of your game manual that will show the specific settings for the default language of your choice. After changing these settings on your MPU board, you must perform a "factory reset" in the game's Utilities menu, or remove one of the batteries on the MPU board for a few minutes to clear memory, then re-start the game. The new default language settings will be installed at that point. All other memory will be cleared and reset (including audits, adjustments, settings, and high scores). Your game will also display a message stating "factory settings restored". Turn game off then back on, and everything should be back to normal, with your new default language installed.

    Need a manual for your game? Click here to browse or search by game name using the Search feature at the top of any page.

    Some WPC games DO have language-specific chips (as mentioned above), but not many. If you have any questions about your specific game, look up ROM chips for it by using the Search feature at the top of any page, or contact us.

    Sound ROMs usually do not have to be changed, other than for some specific games, as mentioned above.

    - Here is an example from the selection of ROM chips we carry: WhoDunnit



    Disclaimer:

    • Action Pinball & Amusement, LLC, assumes no responsibility or liability for any problems, damage, or loss caused to you, your game, or your location due to faulty ROM chip(s), USB key(s), SD memory cards, or the software residing on these devices, or any improper use or improper installation of such devices. Devices provided by Action Pinball & Amusement, LLC, are used and installed at your own risk. Any warranty covers only the device itself. Warranty does not cover damage to you, your game, or your location, or any loss of profits or use. You assume full responsibility for any problems that may occur from use of devices from Action Pinball & Amusement, LLC.

    Important Notes and Legalities:

    Prices charged for ROM chips, USB keys, and SD memory cards supplied by Action Pinball & Amusement, LLC, cover only the cost of the chip or media, and a service charge for handling. There is no charge assessed for the software itself which is programmed onto the chip. Software is property of the author. We do not own or sell any software- simply the chips or media upon which the software resides.

    Officially-Released Chips for Bally/Williams Games (WMS Electronics Games, Inc.):
    ROM Chips, USB Keys, and SD Memory Cards For Any/All Games:
    • Most manufacturer's copyrights require you to own the particular game you are obtaining replacement software for, so any media we provide with software residing on, are provided soley on that basis. We are not selling the copyrighted software- just the physical devices themselves that the software resides on, for use as replacement or upgrade in your game.
    • In accordance with the Williams Electronics Games, Inc. Software License, we do not supply or distribute individual ROM images (data). Requests for ROM images will be ignored and discarded.
    • In accordance with copyright and distribution restrictions on chips of other/all manufacturers, we do not supply or distribute individual ROM images (data). Requests for ROM images will be ignored and discarded.
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